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Halloween Hype 2011, Pt. XIII
Cannibal Holocaust
[1980 / Ruggero Deodato / ****½]
As brutal as always. As as difficult as some scenes are, it’s hard to look away. And gotdamn if Riz Ortolani’s score isn’t one of the best ever.
As HallowMonth/HalloWeek/HalloEverything winds down (sad), I may be ramping up my viewings and shorting these entries to just the basics (i.e. no write-ups).

Halloween Hype 2011, Pt. XIII

Cannibal Holocaust

[1980 / Ruggero Deodato / ****½]

As brutal as always. As as difficult as some scenes are, it’s hard to look away. And gotdamn if Riz Ortolani’s score isn’t one of the best ever.

As HallowMonth/HalloWeek/HalloEverything winds down (sad), I may be ramping up my viewings and shorting these entries to just the basics (i.e. no write-ups).

1 Notes

Halloween Hype 2010, Pt. VII
The House on the Edge of the Park [La casa sperduta nel parco]
[1980 / Ruggero Deodato / **½]
I didn’t link to the trailer in the title like I’ve been doing, as it’s far too spoilerific (even for a film I don’t love I’d rather not spoil it for someone who might really enjoy it). So instead I’ve linked to the rare amusing scene in the film, completely out of context! Really enjoyed that scene actually. Giovanni Lombardo Radice is a dancing machine.
I didn’t really expect much out of this movie. All I knew was that I enjoyed other work by the main participants (director Deodato from Cannibal Holocaust, star David Hess from The Last House on the Left and side-kick Radice from Cannibal Ferox). The movie was okay. It passed the time and I didn’t abhor it like many of the reviews I’ve since read did (the characters were despicable but I wouldn’t say that the filmmaking was). It wasn’t well-made by any means and the premise has been covered many times (like in the aforementioned, more effective Last House on the Left and in the repulsive-but-I-need-to-see-it-again I Spit On Your Grave). But David Hess played the slimy lead-rapist perfectly (that doesn’t sound good) and the production values were minimalist enough that I did get that always enjoyable cheapie exploitation vibe somewhat. The two Riz Ortolani songs in the film were great (there are hardly any actual music cues or themes though). So, a mixed-bag but I like that I’ve continued to focus on unseen films, mainly from the 70s or early 80s it seems.
The screen-grab I took of the opening credits above are in Italian and it seems to have been filmed on a sound stage in Italy but I do believe it was made mainly for the American market. The actors are the typical hodge-podge of Italians and Americans. I always get a kick out of the necessity to dub the multilingual cast in order to have a consistent final product. Here’s the English version of the opening title screen.

Halloween Hype 2010, Pt. VII

The House on the Edge of the Park [La casa sperduta nel parco]

[1980 / Ruggero Deodato / **½]

I didn’t link to the trailer in the title like I’ve been doing, as it’s far too spoilerific (even for a film I don’t love I’d rather not spoil it for someone who might really enjoy it). So instead I’ve linked to the rare amusing scene in the film, completely out of context! Really enjoyed that scene actually. Giovanni Lombardo Radice is a dancing machine.

I didn’t really expect much out of this movie. All I knew was that I enjoyed other work by the main participants (director Deodato from Cannibal Holocaust, star David Hess from The Last House on the Left and side-kick Radice from Cannibal Ferox). The movie was okay. It passed the time and I didn’t abhor it like many of the reviews I’ve since read did (the characters were despicable but I wouldn’t say that the filmmaking was). It wasn’t well-made by any means and the premise has been covered many times (like in the aforementioned, more effective Last House on the Left and in the repulsive-but-I-need-to-see-it-again I Spit On Your Grave). But David Hess played the slimy lead-rapist perfectly (that doesn’t sound good) and the production values were minimalist enough that I did get that always enjoyable cheapie exploitation vibe somewhat. The two Riz Ortolani songs in the film were great (there are hardly any actual music cues or themes though). So, a mixed-bag but I like that I’ve continued to focus on unseen films, mainly from the 70s or early 80s it seems.

The screen-grab I took of the opening credits above are in Italian and it seems to have been filmed on a sound stage in Italy but I do believe it was made mainly for the American market. The actors are the typical hodge-podge of Italians and Americans. I always get a kick out of the necessity to dub the multilingual cast in order to have a consistent final product. Here’s the English version of the opening title screen.

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